Modern Trends In Education: 50 Different Approaches To Learning | Teach Thought

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Photo Credit: http://www.teachthought.com and flickr user tulanepublicrelations

Education sprouts in many forms depending on how you look at it. Our views of what it should look like and how it should materialize depend on our value of it and our experience with it.

What if a class consisted of words that led to information that whirled into blended realms of creativity set up just for students, created by students. The students then dictated what they learned instead of reluctantly ingesting information and standards imposed upon them.

That exists here and now. In every nook and cranny, around every corner, inside every well-engineered lesson, students might just learn what they want to learn and actually find success while improving the world around them.

Take a tour of 50 different views of education that somehow find a similar note:  Education must change.

1. Ground Up Diversity

Sir Ken Robinson campaigns changing education through talks, writing, advising, and teaching. He believes education must change because it’s a stale environment in which most students don’t really learn what they should or want to learn. How that happens makes all the difference—from the ground up. People, students, and teachers create the change not the administrators or the executives.

Read the remainder of this great article by clicking the link below!

Modern Trends In Education: 50 Different Approaches To Learning.

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“The pessimist complains about the wind. The optimist expects it to change. The leader adjusts the sails.”

- John Maxwell

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